US housing starts total 1.35 million in May, vs 1.31 million starts expected


Permits to build single-family homes fell 2.2 percent in May to a pace of 844,000 units, also the lowest level since September 2017. With permits lagging starts, single-family homebuilding could slow in the months ahead.

A survey on Monday showed confidence among single-family homebuilders dipped in June, with builders “increasingly concerned that tariffs placed on Canadian lumber and other imported products are hurting housing affordability.” According to the survey, the expensive lumber had “added nearly $9,000 to the price of a new single-family home since January 2017.”

The Trump administration in April 2017 imposed anti-subsidy duties on imports of Canadian softwood lumber. More expensive lumber together with a lack of land and labor have worsened an acute shortage of homes for sale, hobbling the housing market.

Residential investment contracted in the first quarter. The housing market continues to lag overall economic growth, which appears to be accelerating in the second quarter after hitting a speed bump at the start of the year.

Starts for the volatile multi-family housing segment rebounded 7.5 percent to a rate of 414,000 units in May. Permits for the construction of multi-family homes fell 8.8 percent to a pace of 457,000 units.



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